Guide Malaysia     

Guideline requirement for importation of meat and meat product to Malaysia EU Asia Cooperation on (Phyto-) Sanitary (SPS) and Food Safety Regulation

 

The region’s large Muslim population is gaining interest in global food trends, cuisines, and innovation. The halal packaged food consumers are focusing on awareness of health and wellness issues. This guide will help EU exporters to enter developing markets in the region, will facilitate companies to secure halal certification, as products with halal “certification“ will appeal to Muslim consumers more than other non-certified products.

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 2 Guide cover China   

 

 

Guideline requirement for a comparison of PRC legislation and food standards related to hygiene and food safety in the production of pork, beef and poultry meat and offal versus pertinent EU legislation

 

The present document compares EU legislation applicable to the production of fresh meat and poultry with the respective legal requirements of the People’s Republic of China, as published in the relevant Food Safety Standards and the Compliance Checklist for Registration of Overseas Establishments of meat to be Exported to P.R. China that was made available to the EU Commission by the General Customs Administration of China.

For the purpose of this study, 21 Chinese National Standards dealing with food hygiene, animal slaughter, meat processing, drinking water, residues and contaminants were evaluated. The provisions were compared with the EU requirements that are applicable and legally binding for all operators and authorities in the EU. The evaluation was occasionally complicated by the fact that overlapping provisions exist in the many Chinese standards, which are not always consistent.

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 3 Guide India    

Revised handbook for EU exporters of plants and plant products to India

 "This reviewed Handbook is designed to assist exporters and competent authorities in the European Union in successfully accessing the Indian market of plants and plant products. The handbook is also available in the European Commission’s Access2Markets database1.

India’s rules for importing plant and plant products are unique in that they distinguish between products for which import is: i) prohibited (Schedule-IV) ii) restricted and permissible only by authorised institutions with additional declarations special conditions (Schedule-V) iii) permitted with additional declarations and special conditions (Schedule-VI) iv) permissible on the basis of a phytosanitary certificate issued by the exporting country (Schedule-VII)

These rules are laid out in India’s Plant Quarantine Order, where products falling within these categories are specified in Schedules IV through VII. In effect, Indian maintains a ‘positive list’ of plants and plant products that can be imported, which differs from places such as the EU that maintain negative lists, identifying only those products that cannot be imported. As a rule of thumb, you should consider products as being increasingly easier to export – that is, subject to fewer restrictions – as you ascend from Schedule-IV (banned) to Schedule-VII. These rules are laid out in India’s Plant Quarantine Order, where products falling within these categories are specified in Schedules IV through VII. In effect, Indian maintains a ‘positive list’ of plants and plant products that can be imported, which differs from places such as the EU that maintain negative lists, identifying only those products that cannot be imported. As a rule of thumb, you should consider products as being increasingly easier to export – that is, subject to fewer restrictions – as you ascend from Schedule-IV (banned) to Schedule-VII."


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